Wed, July 21, 2010 7:34:39 AMFW: NRDC Water/Climate Study covered by 284 outlets and counting

Staying on top of the issue of the day.The NRDC is on top of this ever-so-critical issue.
Matt

Global warming raises water shortage risks in one-third of U.S. counties, USA Today/Greenhouse, 07/20/10. High-risk areas include parts of Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.

Report: Warmer climate puts water supplies at risk, Associated Press, 07/20/10. A new report says more than 1,000 counties across the United States are at risk for potential water shortages by midcentury as warmer temperatures deplete supplies and demand for water rises.

Water crisis seen big threat to U.S. West and South, Reuters, 07/20/10. An estimated $100 billion in crops needed for food, fuel and livestock feed grown in those areas could be threatened, according to the study. Food production and agriculture are the largest consumers of fresh water, requiring 100 times more than the amount used for daily personal needs, “We hope this is a wake-up call,” said Theo Spencer, a climate specialist with the Natural Defense Resource Council, one of the nation’s largest environmental groups.

CLIMATE: Midcentury water shortages loom in 1 of 3 counties – report, E & E Publishing (see below), 07/20/10. More than a third of the counties in the lower 48 states face increased threats of midcentury water shortages due to global warming, according to a report the Natural Resources Defense Council released today as part of a campaign for climate legislation.

Report: How Climate Change Could Impact Crops, Farm Futures, 07/20/10. “This analysis shows climate change will take a serious toll on water supplies throughout the country in the coming decades, with over one out of three U.S. counties facing greater risks of water shortages,” says Dan Lashof, director of NRDC’s Climate Center. “Water shortages can strangle economic development and agricultural production… cities and states will bear real and significant costs if Congress fails to take the steps necessary to slow down and reverse the warming trend.”

Widespread water shortages due to climate change, report says, WaterWorld, 07/20/10. Estimated water withdrawal as a percentage of available precipitation is generally less than 5 percent for the majority of the Eastern United States, and less than 30 percent for the majority of the Western United States. But in some arid regions (such as Texas, the Southwest, and California) and agricultural areas, water withdrawal is greater than 100 percent of the available precipitation. In other words, in many places, water is already used in quantities that exceed supply.

Zooming In on Future Water Shortages, Science Magazine/Science Insider, 07/20/10. Analysts led by environmental engineer Sujoy Roy of Tetra Tech Inc. in Lafayette, California, pulled together the most current projections from 16 climate models. They also gathered county-level data on water resources and consumption by cities, farms, and other users. In 14 states, particularly in the Great Plains and southwest, 400 counties will face an “extremely high risk” of water shortages by midcentury. All told, 1100 counties face at least a high risk. Although not the first analysis of possible water shortages in the United States, the report does drill down deeper, Roy says. “The particular novelty is the spatial resolution and the ability to zoom in at a more detailed level than before.” NRDC created a Google Earth tool for viewing the results.

Study predicts future water shortages, Ag Weekly, 07/20/10. The report uses publicly available water use data across the United States and climate projections from a set of models used in recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) work to evaluate withdrawals related to renewable water supply. The report finds that 14 states face an extreme or high risk to water sustainability, or are likely to see limitations on water availability as demand exceeds supply by 2050. These areas include parts of Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. In particular, in the Great Plains and Southwest United States, water sustainability is at extreme risk.

Study: 14 States At Severe Risk Of Water Shortages, Croplife, 07/19/10. Water shortage risks will hit a very large percentage of all U.S. counties by mid-century, according to a major new TetraTech study released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

E&E News PM — CLIMATE: Midcentury water shortages loom in 1 of 3 counties — report (07/20/2010)

Paul Quinlan, E&E reporter
More than a third of the counties in the lower 48 states face increased threats of midcentury water shortages due to global warming, according to a report the Natural Resources Defense Council released today as part of a campaign for climate legislation.

Four hundred of 1,100 counties facing water woes have an “extremely high risk” of shortages, a fourteenfold increase over previous studies, the analysis by engineering consultancy Tetra Tech found.

Parts of 14 states face extreme or high risks to water sustainability, the report says: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. Facing the most serious threats, it says, are the Great Plains and the Southwest.

NRDC cited the report in urging Congress to take action aimed at slowing down or reversing global warming.

“This analysis shows climate change will take a serious toll on water supplies throughout the country in the coming decades,” said Dan Lashof, director of the NRDC’s Climate Center, in a statement. “The only way to truly manage the risks exposed by this report is for Congress to pass meaningful legislation that cuts global warming pollution and allows the U.S. to exercise global leadership.”

The report used public water-use data and climate projections based on models that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used to evaluate water withdrawals.

Midcentury water withdrawals will grow by 25 percent in many areas, the report says, including Arizona and New Mexico, the south Atlantic Coast, Florida, the Mississippi River Basin and the District of Columbia.

Water withdrawals already exceed 100 percent of available precipitation in arid parts of Texas, the Southwest, California and agricultural areas, the report says.

Click here for a summary of the report and related links.

“I assumed everything was O.K., because I reported it to the team leader and he should have reported it to M.M.S.,” Mr. Sepulvado said.

He could not explain why the company did not respond to his report.

His testimony came at an investigative hearing in this New Orleans suburb conducted by the Coast Guard and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, which used to be the minerals service.

Investigators also pressed Mr. Sepulvado about two audits that found problems with other equipment on the Deepwater Horizon and the well it was drilling, including the blowout preventer, known as a BOP.

“In both of those audits, it indicated that the BOP was well past” its inspection date, said Jason Mathews, a panel member. Asked whether he realized that the manufacturer of the blowout preventer required that the device undergo specific tests every five years, Mr. Sepulvado said, “No, I did not.”

The audits of the rig were conducted by BP in September 2009 and by the American Petroleum Institute in April 2010. The company’s audit identified problems with the rig’s engines, ballast systems, thrusters and drilling equipment, and as a result, BP scheduled the rig for a shipyard visit in early 2011.

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One Response to “Wed, July 21, 2010 7:34:39 AMFW: NRDC Water/Climate Study covered by 284 outlets and counting”

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